Jess

Jess

Coming over from Goodreads, dipping a toe in the waters over here.

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Fish & Chips
Abigail Roux, Madeleine Urban
Progress: 26 %
Strength of the Wolf (The Tameness of the Wolf, #2) - Kendall McKenna 2.5 stars rounded up because of the halo effect from the first bookInsta-love is one of my least favorite tropes, especially when I can't figure out what the guys see in each other. And insta-love with no real plot and very little action (aside from lots - and lots and lots and lots - of sex)? No thanks.Other than a pretty face, what did Tim find remotely appealing about Jeremy at first? Seriously. It made no sense to me that Tim would want to spend any time at all with Jeremy as we saw him through the first 2/3 of the book. I certainly didn't find Jeremy particularly appealing, but I've loved books with characters I wouldn't want to date - just make a clear case for why they're the right person for someone else.I had only slightly more idea why Jeremy was with Tim. I loved Tim in the last book, but he didn't seem nearly as awesome in this one. And Jeremy didn't even have that context, he just saw a guy who was telling him how to behave better. So maybe it was some sort of daddy thing?At any rate, it was a sad contrast to the first book where the guys had common interests and goals, and it made sense to me that they'd want to be together. The first book also had exciting action, which this one lacked, with a few exceptions (those were my favorite parts of the book). Lack of action doesn't have to be boring. This could have been a great character-growth story, but although there was some, that wasn't the focus. Actually, I'm not sure what the focus was. Was there one? Other than lots and lots of sex?The first book had had some odd word choices (like calling an asshole a 'fissure') but this one not only had that, it also had missing words, wrong words, and entire sentences that I struggled to parse. For example:Tim was as happy being the young barista’s guinea pig, as she enjoyed experimenting on him. She constantly developed new recipes and never once scalded the espresso.Humor filled Tim with enough power that he had the urge to laugh out loud.(Emphasis mine) What does that mean? Where did the humor come from, how did it fill Tim with power, and since when is power a prerequisite to laughing out loud?Also, why were all the "bad" wolves beige or brown, the True Alphas white or black, and everyone else shades of gray? I figured the desert wolves were beige because, y'know, camouflage. But when the only other baddies we met were brown, it made me wonder.There were also a number of seemingly-significant things that never seemed to go anywhere. There was one in the first book I wondered about, that I found myself still wondering here: what the heck is the big deal about sniffing the small of the back? That was a fairly trivial one, but I did wonder. In addition to that, there were a few rather major things brought up or tossed out, and then apparently forgotten about. All the more frustrating when they might have made the story so much more interesting, like why was Jeremy Transitioning so late?I enjoyed the book enough to keep picking it back up, but barely. I like spending time in this world. I find it fascinating, particularly when they're in theater, and I'd love to spend more time there. But by the end of the book, I was eager for it to finish. I just wanted to be done with the darn thing. That's a very disappointing contrast to the end of the first book, which left me eager for more.